Product Details

ALLERQUE

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Natural Relief from the Misery of Headaches & Allergies

  • Helps relieve allergy symptoms and prevents histamine release
  • Reduces the frequency and severity of headaches and migraines
  • Formulated with clinically studied natural ingredients and extracts

 

Use this product for:

Many people suffer from daily and seasonal allergies and headaches. Both of these processes are defined by excessive inflammation and histamine production. AllerQue provides natural relief from the misery of headaches, allergies and asthma by preventing histamine release and promoting relaxation of the airways. AllerQue contains butterbur extract, the flavonoid quercetin and rosemary extract, natural compounds that work together for natural allergy relief. 

The ingredients in AllerQue work at a number of different levels to block allergic responses and alleviate symptoms of allergies by preventing the release of histamine and other allergic mediators. They also block the production of other major pro-inflammatory signaling molecules, and decrease the production and activation of immune cells that contribute to allergic and inflammatory pathways. AllerQue may also help reduce headaches or migraines related to allergies and improve lung ventilation and bronchial reactivity.

The ingredients in AllerQue can work very quickly to decrease unnecessary inflammatory and immune responses that are responsible for the misery of headaches, allergies and allergy-related airway constriction. Some people experience relief within a few hours without having to rely on strong pain or allergy medications.

 

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Discussion

AllerQue™ contains rosemary traditionally used in Herbal Medicine to help ease headaches, as well as antioxidants for the maintenance of good health. 

Product Variations

NPN Product Code Size
80038081 AOR04240 90 VEGI-CAPS

Supplement Facts

Amount Per Serving Amount: 1 Capsule
50 mg Butterbur extract (85:1, PA-free)
200 mg Quercetin
167 mg Rosemary extract (5-10:1)
Non-medicinal ingredients: gum Arabic, maltodextrin, silicon dioxide. Capsule: hypromellose.

AOR™ guarantees that all ingredients have been declared on the label. Contains no wheat, gluten, nuts, peanuts, sesame seeds, sulphites, mustard, soy, dairy, eggs, fish, shellfish or any animal byproduct.

Suggested Use:

(Adult): Take 1 capsule daily with food, or as directed by a qualified health care practitioner.

Cautions :

Do not use if pregnant or breastfeeding. Consult a health care practitioner for use beyond 1 month or if symptoms persist or worsen. Some people may experience gastrointestinal discomfort (such as eructation).

Pregnancy/Breastfeeding :

Source:

Natural botanical extracts

Main Applications:

  • Headaches
  • Allergies
  • Asthma
  • Antioxidant

The information and product descriptions appearing on this website are for information purposes only, and are not intended to provide or replace medical advice to individuals from a qualified health care professional. Consult with your physician if you have any health concerns, and before initiating any new diet, exercise, supplement, or other lifestyle changes.

Natural Relief from the Misery of Headaches & Allergies

AllerQue contains several natural compounds that work together to relieve the miserable symptoms of headaches as well as allergies that stem from inappropriate inflammation and immune responses. They reduce levels or responses of IgE, the antibody that recognizes an allergen and initiates an allergic response. They also prevent the release of histamine and other allergic mediators, block the production of pro-inflammatory signaling molecules, and decrease the production and activation of immune cells that contribute to allergic and inflammatory pathways. For those who are sick of dealing with headaches, a stuffy nose, difficulty breathing or even worse symptoms, the compounds of AllerQue are brought together to provide natural relief for the symptoms of such miserable afflictions.

Canadian Statistics

About 59% of adult Canadians suffer from headaches. At least 8% of people of the age of 12 are diagnosed with migraines although up to 17% will experience them at some point in their lifetime.

A whopping 20-25% of Canadians are thought to suffer from seasonal allergic rhinitis.

1 in 13 Canadians have a confirmed food allergy.

Inappropriate Inflammation

Allergies, rhinitis and some types of headaches have a common denominator: inappropriate inflammation and immune responses. In a normal immune system, antibodies patrol the body like tiny police officers in search of proteins that are foreign to the body and signal the presence of a problematic invader. When antibodies find such an invader, they alert the immune cell authorities to trigger an immune response. Inappropriate inflammation stems from an oversensitive immune response to an otherwise benign trigger.

Rosemary

The rosemary herb (Rosmarinus officinalis) has been traditionally used for a variety of ailments in folk medicine including headache relief. It is believed to have anti-inflammatory effects, inhibiting NF-kB and the cascade of inflammatory molecules that follow.

Butterbur

Butterbur (Petasites hybridus) is a small shrub found in Europe and other parts of the world. It has been used for centuries in Europe to treat ailments such as fever, cough and asthma. Today it is used for headaches, urinary tract spasms and seasonal allergic rhinitis. The mechanisms of action making it useful for such seemingly different problems are linked to its antispasmodic effects and its effects on histamine release. Its antispasmodic activity on smooth muscle cells means that it reduces their ability to contract and constrict. Butterbur has also been noted to reduce histamine release from mast cells, which is partly responsible for allergic reactions as well as migraines and other types of pain.

Quercetin

Quercetin is a flavonoid or pigment found in many foods such as onions and fruit. Quercetin acts as an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antihistamine, making it potentially useful in seasonal allergies, rhinitis, food allergies and cardiovascular health. Although quercetin is an anti-inflammatory and inhibits histamine release, it has not been studied in relieving headaches.

Human studies have focused mostly on cardiovascular health, showing quercetin to support healthy blood vessels and blood pressure. Studies indicate that high intakes of quercetin are linked to lower mortality rates and heart attack.

 

Currently, headaches and migraines are mostly treated with ibuprofen and other over-the-counter anti-inflammatories because there aren’t many natural options available that really work.

Many allergy products on the market are aimed at providing symptom relief but do not address the underlying inflammation associated with allergies. These medications may also become ineffective and intolerable over time.

 

AllerQue provides a combination of three natural and powerful herbs clinically shown to decrease the hyperreactive inflammatory and immune responses that are responsible for the misery of headaches, allergies and allergic asthma. Let AllerQue help you tame haywire immune responses with all natural ingredients. Studies show that headache and migraine relief requires several months of supplementing before noticing effects, while seasonal allergy symptoms require only several weeks of use for effective support.

Headaches & Migraines

Butterbur: Migraines are characterized by inappropriate inflammation. Butterbur has been shown in several clinical trials to reduce the frequency of headache and migraine attacks in adults at a dose of 150 mg per day when taken for 3-4 months. In a double-blind placebo-controlled study, butterbur supplementation led to up to a 60% decrease in migraine frequency compared to the placebo group, and the migraine symptoms decreased in duration and intensity.

In an open study in children aged 6-17 years with severe migraines, 50-150mg/day of butterbur was given over 4 months, and three quarters of the patients experienced at least half as many migraines.

Allergic Rhinitis

Rosemary contains a compound called rosmarinic acid which has been shown to be highly beneficial for the relief of allergy symptoms. A randomized, double-blind, age-matched placebo-controlled parallel group study observed the effects of rosmarinic acid on 30 patients with seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (SAR). At the end of the trial period, there was a significant relief of itchy nose, watery eyes, itchy eyes and total symptoms. 55.6-70% of patients given rosmarinic acid reported global symptom relief, compared to only 30% of the placebo group.

Quercetin: In vitro and animal studies have found that quercetin is a powerful anti-inflammatory, inhibits histamine release from mast cells and reduces eosinophil production, which has implications for those with allergic allergies.

Not only has quercetin been studied as a potential treatment for seasonal allergies and related issues, there is also potential for it to help reduce the severity of anaphylactic allergic reactions to foods such as peanuts. In fact, rats that were sensitized to peanuts and then given quercetin for 4 weeks had no anaphylactic reaction whatsoever to peanuts compared to the control group. The authors suggested that quercetin suppresses Immunoglobulin E (IgE), which reduces histamine production.

Butterbur: Studies have found that Petasites had a comparable effect to the antihistamines Cetirizine and fexofenadine for seasonal allergic rhinitis and house dust mite allergies, likely due to its effectiveness at reducing nasal responsiveness. It did not have the sedative effect associated with the drug Cetirizine. In another randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind study, patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis who were sensitized to grass and pollen had reduced nasal symptoms after taking 50mg of butterbur for 2 weeks.

Allergic & Non-Allergic Airway Responses

Quercetin has been shown in in vitro and animal studies to relax the airway muscles and reduce airway hyperreactivity in allergic and non-allergic patients.

Quercetin has been shown in vitro and in mice to inhibit the replication of rhinovirus, the virus responsible for the majority of colds, as well as reduce inflammation in the airway that an infection with rhinovirus can cause. This is also good news for those with COPD since the rhinovirus can exacerbate their pre-existing conditions.

Butterbur has been shown to the frequency, severity and duration of respiratory attacks in children and adults after 2 months of treatment, and some patients were even able to reduce their medication usage. A study of patients with respiratory issues or bronchitis found that butterbur improved lung ventilation and bronchial reactivity.

Isopetasin, a constituent in butterbur, has been shown to have antispasmodic effects on smooth muscle such as in the trachea in animals. It is thought to inhibit muscarinic receptors, inhibit histamine release, and reduce Ca2 -induced contractions in the trachea. All of this may make it helpful for those with respiratory problems and COPD.

 

Agosti R, Duke RK, Chrubasik JE, Chrubasik S. Effectiveness of Petasites hybridus preparations in the prophylaxis of migraine: a systematic review. Phytomedicine. 2006 Nov;13(9-10):743-6.

Allergy & Asthma Association 2009.

Al-Sereitia MR, Abu-Amerb KM and Sena P. Pharmacology of rosemary (Rosemarinus officinalis Linn.) and its therapeutic potentials. Indian Journal of Experimental Biology. 1999;37:124-131.

Ben-Shoshan M, Harrington DW, Soller L, Fragapane J, Joseph L, St Pierre Y, Godefroy SB, Elliott SJ, Clarke AE. A population-based study on peanut, tree nut, fish, shellfish, and sesame allergy prevalence in Canada. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2010 Jun;125(6):1327-35.

Danesch UC. Petasites hybridus (Butterbur root) extract in the treatment of asthma- an open trial. Altern Med Rev. 2004;9(1):54-62.

Ganesan S, Faris AN, Comstock AT, Wang Q, Nanua S, Hershenson MB, Sajjan US. Quercetin inhibits rhinovirus replication in vitro and in vivo. Antiviral Res. 2012 Jun;94(3):258-71.

Gilmour H & Wilkins K. Migraine. Statistics Canada, Catalogue 82-003. Health Reports, 12(2): 23-39.

Joskova M, Franova S, Sadlonova V. Acute bronchodilator effect of quercetin in experimental allergic asthma. Bratisl Lek Listy. 2011;112(1):9-12.

Kimata M, Shichijo M, Miura T, Serizawa I, Inagaki N and Nagai H. Effects of luteolin, quercetin and baicalein on immunoglobulin E-mediated mediator release from human cultured mast cells. Clinical and Experimental Allergy. 2000;30:501-508.

Ko WC, Lei CB, Lin YL, Chen CF. Mechanisms of relaxant action of S-petasin and S-isopetasin, sesquiterpenes of Petasites formosanus, in isolated guinea pig trachea. Planta Med. 2001 Apr;67(3):224-9.

Lee DKC, Carstairs IJ, Haggart K, Jackson CM, Currie GP and Lipworth BJ. Butterbur, a herbal remedy, attenuates adenosine monophosphate induced nasal responsiveness in seasonal allergic rhinitis. Clin Exp Allergy. 2003;33:882-886.

Lee DK, Gray RD, Robb FM, Fujihara S, Lipworth BJ. A placebo-controlled evaluation of butterbur and fexofenadine on objective and subjective outcomes in perennial allergic rhinitis. Clin Exp Allergy. 2004 Apr;34(4):646-9.

Lin LH, Huang TJ, Wang SH, Lin YL, Wu SN, Ko WC. Bronchodilatory effects of S-isopetasin, an antimuscarinic sesquiterpene of Petasites formosanus, on obstructive airway hyperresponsiveness. Eur J Pharmacol. 2008 Apr 28;584(2-3):398-404.

Lipton RB, Göbel H, Einhäupl KM, Wilks K, Mauskop A. Petasites hybridus root (butterbur) is an effective preventive treatment for migraine. Neurology. 2004 Dec 28;63(12):2240-4.

Monograph. Petasites hybridus. Altern Med Rev. 2001 Apr;6(2):207-9.

Pothmann R, Danesch U. Migraine prevention in children and adolescents: results of an open study with a special butterbur root extract. Headache. 2005 Mar;45(3):196-203.

Rogerio AP, Kanashiro A, Fontanari C, da Silva EVG, Lucisano-Valim YM, Soares EG and Faccioli LH. Anti-inflammatory activity of quercetin and isoquercitrin in experimental murine allergic asthma.  Inflamm. res. 2007; 56:402-408.

Sanbongi C, Takano H, Osakabe N, Sasa N, Natsume M, Yanagisawa R, Inoue K-I, Sadakane K, Icinose T and Yoshikawa T. Rosmarinic acid in perilla extract inhibits allergic inflammation induced by mite allergen, in a mouse model. Clin Exp Allergy. 2004;34:971-977.

Shishehbor F, Behroo L, Ghafouriyan Broujerdnia M, Namjoyan F, Latifi SM. Quercetin effectively quells peanut-induced anaphylactic reactions in the peanut sensitized rats. Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2010 Mar;9(1):27-34.

Takano H, Osakabe N, Sanbongi C, Yanagisawa R, Inoue K-I, Yasuda A, Natsume M, Baba S, Ichiishi E-I and Yoshikawa T. Extract of Perilla frutescens enriched for rosmarinic acid, a polyphenolic phytochemical, inhibits seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in humans. Exp Biol Med. 2004;229:247-254.

Townsend EA, Emala CW Sr. Quercetin acutely relaxes airway smooth muscle and potentiates β-agonist-induced relaxation via dual phosphodiesterase inhibition of PLCβ and PDE4. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2013 Sep;305(5):L396-403.

Yu MH, Choi JH, Chae IG, Im HG, Yang SA, More K, Lee IS, Lee J. Suppression of LPS-induced inflammatory activities by Rosmarinus officinalis L. Food Chem. 2013 Jan 15;136(2):1047-54.

 

Suppression of LPS-induced inflammatory activities by Rosmarinus officinalis L.

Food Chem. 2013 Jan 15;136(2):1047-54.

Yu MH, Choi JH, Chae IG, Im HG, Yang SA, More K, Lee IS, Lee J.

Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) has been used in folk medicine to treat headaches, epilepsy, poor circulation, and many other ailments. It was found that rosemary could act as a stimulant and mild analgesic and could reduce inflammation. However, the mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory effects of rosemary need more study to be established. Therefore, in this study, the effects of rosemary on the activation of nuclear factor kappa beta (NF-kB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and the production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), and cytokine in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells were investigated. A methanol extract of rosemary and its hexane fraction reduced NO generation with an IC(50) of 2.75 and 2.83 μg/ml, respectively. Also, the methanol extract and the hexane fraction inhibited LPS-induced MAPKs and NF-kB activation associated with the inhibition of iNOS or COX-2 expression. LPS-induced production of PGE(2) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were blocked by rosemary. Rosemary extract and its hexane fraction are important for the prevention of phosphorylation of MAPKs, thereby blocking NF-kB activation, which in turn leads to decreased expression of iNOS and COX-2, thus preventing inflammation.

 

Quercetin inhibits rhinovirus replication in vitro and in vivo.

Antiviral Res. 2012 Jun;94(3):258-71.

Ganesan S, Faris AN, Comstock AT, Wang Q, Nanua S, Hershenson MB, Sajjan US.

Rhinovirus (RV), which is responsible for the majority of common colds, also causes exacerbations in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. So far, there are no drugs available for treatment of rhinovirus infection. We examined the effect of quercetin, a plant flavanol on RV infection in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment of airway epithelial cells with quercetin decreased Akt phosphosphorylation, viral endocytosis and IL-8 responses. Addition of quercetin 6h after RV infection (after viral endocytosis) reduced viral load, IL-8 and IFN responses in airway epithelial cells. This was associated with decreased levels of negative and positive strand viral RNA, and RV capsid protein, abrogation of RV-induced eIF4GI cleavage and increased phosphorylation of eIF2α. In mice infected with RV, quercetin treatment decreased viral replication as well as expression of chemokines and cytokines. Quercetin treatment also attenuated RV-induced airway cholinergic hyperresponsiveness. Together, our results suggest that quercetin inhibits RV endocytosis and replication in airway epithelial cells at multiple stages of the RV life cycle. Quercetin also decreases expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and improves lung function in RV-infected mice. Based on these observations, further studies examining the potential benefits of quercetin in the prevention and treatment of RV infection are warranted.

 

Quercetin effectively quells peanut-induced anaphylactic reactions in the peanut sensitized rats.

Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2010 Mar;9(1):27-34.

Shishehbor F, Behroo L, Ghafouriyan Broujerdnia M, Namjoyan F, Latifi SM. 

Peanut allergy is the major leading cause of fatal or life-threatening anaphylactic reactions to foods. At present, there is no remedy for this condition. The applied pharmaceutical cares are merely palliative, while their deleterious side effects have already been established. Hence, many sufferers search for complementary and alternative medicines. A versatile-, “flavonol” subgroup-member of the flavonoid family, quercetin, is of paramount interest to investigators. In this study the effects of quercetin on peanut-induced anaphylactic reactions were investigated in a rat model of peanut allergy. Wistar rats were sensitized with crude peanut extract in the presence of Cholera toxin and Aluminium hydroxide. Sensitized rats were then allotted into three groups; Positive control, Quercetin-treatment and Sham, (n=7, each). Naive rats (n=7) served as negative controls. One week post-sensitization period, the rats in treatment group were treated with quercetin at a dose of 50 mg/kg(Body Weight)/mL Di-methyl-sulfoxide 5%/rat, over a period of four weeks. Subsequently, rats were challenged, and anaphylactic reaction parameters including variations in plasma histamine levels, vascular permeability, systemic anaphylaxis scores, and total serum Immunoglobulin E levels were measured. After daily-gavaging for four weeks, quercetin completely abrogated peanut-induced anaphylactic reactions following challenges, so that the mean of plasma histamine levels in the quercetin-treated rats, were lower significantly (p=0.004) as compared with positive control group. Our findings suggest that the flavonoid quercetin is potent enough to suppress the on-going Immunoglobulin E responses against peanut proteins, and can be propounded as an alternative medicine to protect against Immunoglobulin E-mediated food allergies.

  

Effectiveness of Petasites hybridus preparations in the prophylaxis of migraine: a systematic review.

Phytomedicine. 2006 Nov;13(9-10):743-6.

Agosti R, Duke RK, Chrubasik JE, Chrubasik S.

The objective of this review was to evaluate the strength of evidence of effectiveness for Petasites hybridus in the prophylaxis of migraine. Several databases and other sources were searched to identify randomised-controlled trials investigating P. hybridus preparations. Two trials totalling 293 patients (60 and 233 patients) were included in this review. Both trials investigated the proprietary Petasites root extract Petadolex. The trials were described in narrative way, taking into consideration methodological quality scores. Pooling of data was not carried out due to the heterogeneity of the results. The extract at higher dose (150 mg) showed a greater decreased frequency of migraine attacks and a greater number of responders (improvement>50%) after treatment over 3-4 months than the extract at lower dose (100 mg) and placebo. Moderate evidence of effectiveness is, thus, available for a higher than the recommended dose of the proprietary Petasites root extract Petadolex in the prophylaxis of migraine. Further rigorous studies are required to confirm effectiveness and safety in long-term use before treatment with Petasites root extract can be recommended as an alternative option in the treatment schedule for the prophylaxis of migraine.

 

Migraine prevention in children and adolescents: results of an open study with a special butterbur root extract.

Headache. 2005 Mar;45(3):196-203.

Pothmann R, Danesch U.

OBJECTIVE: To explore the role of a special butterbur root extract for migraine prevention in children and adolescents with severe migraines.

BACKGROUND: Two randomized and placebo-controlled trials with a total of 289 migraine patients have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of a special butterbur root extract in the reduction of migraine attacks in adults. We studied whether butterbur had the potential as an efficient and well-tolerated migraine preventive in children and adolescents.

DESIGN/METHODS: 108 children and adolescents between the ages of 6 and 17 were included in a multicenter prospective open-label study. Participants suffered from migraines diagnosed according to IHS classifications for at least 1 year. Patients were treated with 50 to 150 mg of the butterbur root extract depending on age for a period of 4 months. Treatment progression was recorded in migraine journals especially designed for children and adolescents.

RESULTS: 77% of all patients reported a reduction in the frequency of migraine attacks of at least 50%. Attack frequency was reduced by 63%. 91% of patients felt substantially or at least slightly improved after 4 months of treatment. About 90% of each, doctors and patients, reported well-being or even improved well-being. Undesired effects (7.4%) included mostly eructation. No serious adverse events occurred and no adverse event caused a premature termination.

CONCLUSIONS: The results and low rate of adverse events in this open prospective migraine prevention study in children and adolescents are similar to the results of two multicenter placebo-controlled butterbur studies in adults. Butterbur root extract shows a potential as an effective and well-tolerated migraine prophylaxis also for children and teenagers.

 

Petasites hybridus root (butterbur) is an effective preventive treatment for migraine.

Neurology. 2004 Dec 28;63(12):2240-4.

Lipton RB, Göbel H, Einhäupl KM, Wilks K, Mauskop A.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of a standardized special root extract from the plant Petasites hybridus as a preventive therapy for migraine.

METHODS: This is a three-arm, parallel-group, randomized trial comparing Petasites extract 75 mg bid, Petasites extract 50 mg bid, or placebo bid in 245 patients with migraine. Eligible patients met International Headache Society criteria for migraine, were ages 18 to 65, and had at least two to six attacks per month over the preceding 3 months. The main outcome measure was the decrease in migraine attack frequency per month calculated as percentage change from baseline over a 4-month treatment period.

RESULTS: Over 4 months of treatment, in the per-protocol analysis, migraine attack frequency was reduced by 48% for Petasites extract 75 mg bid (p = 0.0012 vs placebo), 36% for Petasites extract 50 mg bid (p = 0.127 vs placebo), and 26% for the placebo group. The proportion of patients with a > or =50% reduction in attack frequency after 4 months was 68% for patients in the Petasites extract 75-mg arm and 49% for the placebo arm (p < 0.05). Results were also significant in favor of Petasites 75 mg at 1, 2, and 3 months based on this endpoint. The most frequently reported adverse reactions considered possibly related to treatment were mild gastrointestinal events, predominantly burping.

CONCLUSIONS: Petasites extract 75 mg bid is more effective than placebo and is well tolerated as a preventive therapy for migraine. Petasites 50 mg PO bid was not significantly more effective than placebo on the primary study endpoints.

 

A placebo-controlled evaluation of butterbur and fexofenadine on objective and subjective outcomes in perennial allergic rhinitis.

Clin Exp Allergy. 2004 Apr;34(4):646-9.

Lee DK, Gray RD, Robb FM, Fujihara S, Lipworth BJ.

BACKGROUND: There are presently no placebo-controlled data regarding the effects of butterbur (BB) on subjective and objective outcomes in patients with perennial allergic rhinitis.

OBJECTIVE: We performed a placebo-controlled evaluation of the effects of BB and fexofenadine (FEX) on subjective and objective outcomes in patients with perennial allergic rhinitis.

METHODS: Sixteen patients with perennial allergic rhinitis and house dust mite sensitization were randomized in double-blind cross-over fashion to receive for 1 week either BB 50 mg twice daily, FEX 180 mg once daily and placebo (PL) once daily, or PL twice daily. The peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF) response to adenosine monophosphate (AMP) challenge administered as a single 400 mg/mL dose was measured over a 60-min period after challenge, and domiciliary total nasal symptom score was recorded.

RESULTS: Pre-challenge values for mean /-SEM PNIF (L/min) were not significantly different comparing all groups; BB (138 /-8), FEX (140 /-9), and PL (138 /-8). The maximum % PNIF fall from baseline after nasal AMP challenge was significantly attenuated (P<0.05) compared to PL (46 /-3), with BB (34 /-3) and FEX (39 /-3). The area under the 60-min time-response curve (%.min) was also significantly attenuated (P<0.05) compared to PL (1734 /-156), with BB (1052 /-258) and FEX (1194 /-161). There was also a significant reduction (P<0.05) in total nasal symptom score with BB (1.8 /-0.4) and FEX (1.8 /-0.4), compared to PL (2.8 /-0.5). There were no significant differences between BB and FEX for any outcomes.

CONCLUSION: BB and FEX, in comparison to PL, were equally effective in attenuating the nasal response to AMP and in improving nasal symptoms, highlighting a potential role for BB in the treatment of allergic rhinitis.

Butterbur, a herbal remedy, attenuates adenosine monophosphate induced nasal responsiveness in seasonal allergic rhinitis.

Clin Exp Allergy. 2003 Jul;33(7):882-6.

Lee DK, Carstairs IJ, Haggart K, Jackson CM, Currie GP, Lipworth BJ.

BACKGROUND: Butterbur (BB) or Petasites hybridus, a herbal remedy, exhibits in vitro inhibition of cysteinyl leukotriene biosynthesis. However, no placebo-controlled studies have been performed to evaluate the effectiveness of BB on objective outcomes such as nasal provocation testing in seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR).

METHODS: Twenty patients with grass-pollen-sensitized SAR were randomized in a double-blind, cross-over manner to receive for 2 weeks either BB 50 mg twice daily or placebo (PL) twice daily during the grass pollen season. Nasal adenosine monophosphate (AMP) challenge (the primary outcome) was administered as a single 400 mg/mL dose after each randomized treatment.

RESULTS: Spontaneous recovery following AMP challenge (area under the response time profile curve as % x min /-SEM) was significantly attenuated (P=0.028) with BB (584 /-289) compared to PL (1438 /-240); mean difference: 854 (95% CI 95-1614), and the maximum % peak nasal inspiratory flow reduction from baseline following AMP challenge was significantly blunted (P=0.036) with BB (30 /-4) compared to PL (43 /-5); mean difference: 13 (95% CI 1-25).

CONCLUSIONS: BB exhibited protection against AMP-induced nasal responsiveness during the grass pollen season in sensitized patients. This is turn may explain its potential clinical efficacy in patients with SAR.

 

Petasites hybridus.

Monograph.

Altern Med Rev. 2001 Apr;6(2):207-9.

Petasides hybridus (butterbur) is a perennial shrub, found throughout Europe as well as parts of Asia and North America, that has been used medicinally for centuries. During the Middle Ages butterbur was used to treat plague and fever; in the 17th century its use was noted in treating cough, asthma, and skin wounds. The plant can grow to a height of three feet and is usually found in wet, marshy ground, in damp forests, and adjacent to rivers or streams. Its downy leaves can attain a diameter of three feet, making it the largest of all indigenous floras, and their unique characteristics are responsible for the plant’s botanical and common names. The genus name, Petasites, is derived from the Greek word petasos, which is the felt hat worn by shepherds. The common name of butterbur is attributed to the large leaves being used to wrap butter during warm weather. Other common names include pestwurz (German), blatterdock, bog rhubarb, and butter-dock. Currently, the primary therapeutic uses for butterbur are for prophylactic treatment of migraines, and as an anti-spasmodic agent for chronic cough or asthma. It has also been used successfully in preventing gastric ulcers, and in treating patients with irritable bladder and urinary tract spasms.

 

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