Product Details

ARJUNA FLOW

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Supports Healthy Cardiovascular Function

  • A natural herbal extract to support a healthy heart
  • Supports healthy blood flow
  • Helps reduce blood pressure and balance cholesterol levels
  • Benefits proven by both traditional use and scientific research

 

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Arjuna Flow is Terminalia arjuna, an Ayurvedic herb traditionally used to support heart health. Ayurveda, the ancient medicine system of India, was well aware of the serious health threat posed by cardiovascular disease. In their own terms, the ancient texts of the tradition describe thickening and hardening of the arteries (dhamani praticaya and dhamani kathinaya), resulting in the limitation of the flow of life-energy to the heart (vata dosa) and the painful pressure of angina (ruja). And 1200 years ago, Ayurvedic medicine determined that nature had provided a powerful treatment for these problems in the smooth, white bark of Terminalia arjuna, a tall, dense tree with long, conical leaves and white flowers.

Recent scientific evidence supports this traditional role and demonstrates that arjuna encourages a healthy blood lipid profile and supports the function of the heart muscle by increasing its capacity to pump blood more efficiently. By increasing cardiac capacity, it can improve circulation and reduce symptoms of angina as well as the frequency of attacks.  Studies with arjuna have found that supplementation can help to reduce blood pressure as well as improve the ability to exercise. In patients with cardiovascular problems, arjuna supplementation was found to reduce the signs and symptoms of heart failure. Arjuna may have the ability to protect the heart and reduce damage to the heart muscle after heart attacks.

Arjuna offers long-term health benefits such as antioxidant protection and the promotion of healthy cholesterol balance and blood flow. It is therefore ideal for those who are concerned about their cardiovascular health, who have a weak heart or who have had previous heart attacks.

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Discussion

Arjuna is Terminalia arjuna, a herb used in traditional Ayurvedic medicine as a cardiotonic to support cardiovascular function. Scientific research supports this role through Arjuna’s ability to support the function of the heart muscle. 

Product Variations

NPN Product Code Size
80028928 AOR04026 90 VEGI-CAPS

Supplement Facts

Amount Per Serving Amount: 1 Capsule
500 mg Terminalia arjuna extract
Non-medicinal ingredients: microcrystalline cellulose. Capsule: hypromellose.

AOR™ guarantees that all ingredients have been declared on the label. Contains no wheat, gluten, corn, nuts, peanuts, sesame seeds, sluphites, mustard, soy, dairy, eggs, fish, shellfish or any animal byproduct.

Suggested Use:

(Adult): Take 1 capsule daily with/without food, or as directed by a qualified health care practitioner.

Cautions :

Do not use if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Consult a health care practitioner prior to use if you suffer from cardiac disease, or if symptoms persist or worsen.

Pregnancy/Breastfeeding :

Source:

Terminalia arjuna extract

Main Applications:

  • Cardiovascular health
  • Supports healthy blood flow

The information and product descriptions appearing on this website are for information purposes only, and are not intended to provide or replace medical advice to individuals from a qualified health care professional. Consult with your physician if you have any health concerns, and before initiating any new diet, exercise, supplement, or other lifestyle changes.

An Ayurvedic Herb

Ayurveda, the Vedic “Science of Life,” was well aware of the serious health threat posed by cardiovascular disease. In their own terms, the ancient texts of the tradition describe atherosclerotic thickening (dhamani praticaya) and hardening (dhamani kathinaya) of the channels, resulting in the limitation of the flow of life-energy to the heart (vata dosa) and the painful pressure of angina (ruja). And 1200 years ago, the Ayurvedic physician Vagbhata asserted (in the Vedic medical text the Astang Hridyam) that Nature had provided a powerful medicine for these problems in the smooth, white bark ofTerminalia arjuna, a tall, dense tree with long, conical leaves and white flowers.

Credit to Arjuna’s Cardiovascular Benefits

This traditional use has been validated by solid science over the course of recent decades. More recently, there’s been a great surge of interest in Terminalia arjuna ever since its heart-health benefits were singled out by Dr. Peter J. D’Adamo in his latest book, The Complete Blood Type Diet Encyclopedia. D’Adamo lists Arjuna as a “Daily Herb” for Type A, and as a key part of his “Cardiovascular Protocol” for Type O. But leaving aside Dr. D’Adamo’s speculations, the science supporting Arjuna’s heart-healthy properties is solid ground.

 

Heart ailments are a common concern, especially among the elderly population. Usually, pharmaceutical cocktails are used to help control these issues. Though not well-known in modern medicine or in North-American supplement markets, arjuna has been clinically demonstrated to support healthful heart functions by improving blood flow to the heart, stabilizing blood pressure levels and by balancing cholesterol.

Arjuna Flow is an effective natural remedy to use for heart health management which has been successfully used in traditional and non-traditional medical systems.

Arjuna in Angina

In a recent open trial, twenty patients with stable angina took either an Arjuna-based herbal formula, or isosorbide mononitrate (an angina drug which works similarly to nitroglycerin), for twelve weeks. Arjuna was found to work as well as the drug, but with fewer side effects or signs of toxicity. It alleviated the symptoms of 80% of the angina patients, which is comparable to the 70% of patients relieved by the drug; similarly, Arjuna slashed the frequency of angina attacks by 67%, with the drug again giving similar performance at 73% fewer attacks. The results of a cardiac stress test (which tests how well the heart can cope during exercise, when the body’s need for oxygen puts extra demands on the heart) showed some nominal improvements over the course of the study in both groups, although the changes were not found to be statistically significant in either group.

In an earlier trial in people with both stable and unstable angina, three months of Arjuna supplementation cut angina attacks by 50% among the stable angina patients. These patients also experienced significant reductions in systolic blood pressure, while exercise tolerance improved, with patients taking longer to develop chest pains and signs of oxygen starvation on the electrocardiogram (ECG). While patients with unstable angina did not gain these benefits, both patient groups experienced improvements in the function of the left ventricle, the chamber of the heart that sends blood out to the rest of the body and whose dysfunction is a key part of unstable angina.

Other Heart Health Benefits

Other trials have found that Arjuna has additional, long-term benefits, providing antioxidant protection and supporting healthier cholesterol balance. Animal studies also suggest that Arjuna may reduce damage to the heart muscle after a heart attack, providing protection to the heart in the worst possible crisis.

 

Bharani A, Ganguly A, Bhargava KD. Salutary effect of Terminalia Arjuna in patients with severe refractory heart failure. Int J Cardiol 1995 May; 49(3): 191-9.

Bharani A, Ganguli A, Mathur LK, Jamra Y, Raman PG. Efficacy of Terminalia arjuna in chronic stable angina: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study comparing Terminalia arjuna with isosorbide mononitrate. Indian Heart J. 2002 Mar-Apr;54(2):170-5.

Dwivedi S, Agarwal MP. Antianginal and cardioprotective effects of Terminalia arjuna, an indigenous drug, in coronary artery disease. J Assoc Physicians India. 1994 Apr; 42(4): 287-9.

Dwivedi S, Jauhari R. Beneficial effects of Terminalia arjuna in coronary artery disease. Indian Heart J. 1997 Sep-Oct; 49(5): 507-10.

Gupta R, Singhal S, Goyle A, Sharma VN. Antioxidant and hypocholesterolaemic effects of Terminalia arjuna tree-bark powder: a randomised placebo-controlled trial. J Assoc Physicians India. 2001 Feb; 49: 231-5.

Kumar PU, Adhikari P, Pereira P, Bhat P. Safety and efficacy of Hartone in stable angina pectoris – an open comparative trial. J Assoc Physicians India. 1999 Jul; 47(7): 685-9.

Sumitra M, Manikandan P, Kumar DA, Arutselvan N, Balakrishna K, Manohar BM, Puvanakrishnan R. Experimental myocardial necrosis in rats: role of arjunolic acid on platelet aggregation, coagulation and antioxidant status. Mol Cell Biochem. 2001 Aug; 224(1-2): 135-42.

 

Efficacy of Terminalia arjuna in chronic stable angina: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study comparing Terminalia arjuna with isosorbide mononitrate.

Indian Heart J. 2002 Mar-Apr;54(2):170-5.

Bharani A, Ganguli A, Mathur LK, Jamra Y, Raman PG.

BACKGROUND: Terminalia arjuna, an Indian medicinal plant, has been reported to have beneficial effects in patients with ischemic heart disease in a number of small, open studies. The need for a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study with adequate sample size has long been felt. The bark extract (IPC-53) contains acids (arjunic acid, terminic acid), glycosides (arjunetin arjunosides I-IV), strong antioxidants (flavones, tannins, oligomeric proanthocyanidins), minerals. etc. and exhibits antifailure and anti-ischemic properties.

METHODS AND RESULTS: Fifty-eight males with chronic stable angina (NYHA class II-III) with evidence of provocable ischemia on treadmill exercise test received Terminalia arjuna (500 mg 8 hourly), isosorbide mononitrate (40 mg/daily) or a matching placebo for one week each, separated by a wash-out period of at least three days in a randomized, double-blind, crossover design. They underwent clinical, biochemical and treadmill exercise evaluation at the end of each therapy which were compared during the three therapy periods. Terminalia arjuna therapy was associated with significant decrease in the frequency of angina and need for isosorbide dinitrate (5.69 /-6.91 mg/week v. 18.22 /-9.29 mg/week during placebo therapy, p < 0.005). The treadmill exercise test parameters improved significantly during therapy with Terminalia arjuna compared to those with placebo. The total duration of exercise increased (6.14 /-2.51 min v. 4.76 /-2.38 min, p < 0.005), maximal ST depression during the longest equivalent stages of submaximal exercise decreased (1.41 /-0.55 mm v. 2.21 /-0.56 mm, p < 0.005), time to recovery decreased (6.49 /-2.37 min v. 9.27 /-3.39 min, p < 0.005) and higher double products were achieved (25.75 /-4.81×10(3) v. 23.11 /-4.83×10(3), p < 0.005) during Terminalia arjuna therapy. Similar improvements in clinical and treadmill exercise test parameters were observed with isosorbide mononitrate compared to placebo therapy. No significant differences were observed in clinical or treadmill exercise test parameters when Terminalia arjuna and isosorbide mononitrate therapies were compared. No significant untoward effects were reported during Terminalia arjuna therapy.

CONCLUSIONS: Terminalia arjuna bark extract, 500 mg 8 hourly, given to patients with stable angina with provocable ischemia on treadmill exercise, led to improvement in clinical and treadmill exercise parameters as compared to placebo therapy. These benefits were similar to those observed with isosorbide mononitrate (40 mg/day) therapy and the extract was well tolerated. Limitations of this study include applicability of the results to only men with chronic stable angina but not necessarily to women, as they were not studied.

 

Experimental myocardial necrosis in rats: role of arjunolic acid on platelet aggregation, coagulation and antioxidant status.

Mol Cell Biochem 2001 Aug; 224(1-2): 135-42.

Sumitra M, Manikandan P, Kumar DA, Arutselvan N, Balakrishna K, Manohar BM, Puvanakrishnan R.

Arjunolic acid, a new triterpene and a potent principle from the bark of Terminalia arjuna, has been shown to provide significant cardiac protection in isoproterenol induced myocardial necrosis in rats. To further explore the mechanism of action of arjunolic acid, antiplatelet activity, anticoagulant assays, electrocardiographic changes, serum marker enzymes, antioxidant status, lipid peroxide and myeloperoxidase (MPO) have been measured and the results are compared with a potent cardioprotective drug, acetyl salicylic acid (ASA). Administration of isoproterenol produces electrocardiographic changes such as decreased R amplitude and increased ST segment elevation and has resulted in an increase in serum marker enzyme levels as well as a decrease in enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant levels. Arjunolic acid at an effective dosage of 15 mg/kg body wt. (pre and post treatment), when administered intraperitoneally (i.p.), effects a decrease in serum enzyme levels and the electrocardiographic changes get restored towards normalcy. Arjunolic acid treatment is also shown to prevent the decrease in the levels of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, ceruloplasmin, alpha-tocopherol, reduced glutathione (GSH), ascorbic acid, lipid peroxide, MPO and the cardioprotection is confirmed by the histopathological studies. This study shows that the cardioprotection of arjunolic acid pre and post treatment could possibly be due to the protective effect against the damage caused by myocardial necrosis.

 

Antioxidant and hypocholesterolaemic effects of Terminalia arjuna tree-bark powder: a randomised placebo-controlled trial.

J Assoc Physicians India 2001 Feb; 49: 231-5.

Gupta R, Singhal S, Goyle A, Sharma VN.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the antioxidant and hypocholesterolaemic effects of Terminalia arjuna tree bark (a popular cardiotonic substance in Indian pharmacopoeia) and to compare it with a known antioxidant, vitamin E, we performed a randomized controlled trial.

METHODS: One hundred and five successive patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) presenting to our centre were recruited and using a Latin-square design divided into 3 groups of 35 each. The groups were matched for age, lifestyle and dietary variables, clinical diagnosis and drug treatment status. None of the patients was on lipid-lowering drugs. Supplemental vitamins were stopped for one month before study began and American Heart Association Step II dietary advice was given to all. At baseline, total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL and LDL cholesterol and lipid peroxide estimated as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were determined. Group I received placebo capsules; Group II vitamin E capsules 400 units/day; and Group III received finely pulverized T. arjuna tree bark-powder (500 mg) in capsules daily. Lipids and lipid peroxide levels were determined at 30 days follow-up.

RESULTS: Response rate in various groups varied from 86% to 91%. No significant changes in total, HDL, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides levels were seen in Groups I and II (paired t-test p > 0.05). In Group III there was a significant decrease in total cholesterol (-9.7 /- 12.7%), and LDL cholesterol (-15.8 /- 25.6%) (paired t-test p < 0.01). Lipid peroxide levels decreased significantly in both the treatment groups (p < 0.01). This decrease was more in vitamin E group (-36.4 /- 17.7%) as compared to the T. arjuna group (-29.3 /- 18.9%).

CONCLUSIONS: Terminalia arjuna tree bark powder has significant antioxidant action that is comparable to vitamin E. In addition, it also has a significant hypocholesterolaemic effect.

 

Safety and efficacy of Hartone in stable angina pectoris–an open comparative trial.

J Assoc Physicians India 1999 Jul; 47(7): 685-9.

Kumar PU, Adhikari P, Pereira P, Bhat P.

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of ‘Hartone’–a proprietary herbal product primarily containing Terminalia arjuna in stable angina pectoris patients.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: Ten patients with stable angina pectoris were given Hartone 2 caps twice daily for 6 weeks and 1 cap twice daily for the next 6 weeks. Haematological and biochemical investigations to assess safety were carried out on day 0, day 42 and day 84. Serum lipid profile was done before and after therapy. Efficacy was assessed by considering the reduction in the number of anginal episodes and improvement in stress test. The results were compared with 10 patients of stable angina pectoris on isosorbide mononitrate (ISMN) 20 mg twice daily.

RESULTS: Hartone afforded symptomatic relief in 80% of patients and ISMN in 70%. The number of anginal attacks were reduced from 79/wk to 24/wk by Hartone and from 26/wk to 7/wk by ISMN. Although patients of both groups showed improvement in several stress test parameters compared to base line, the difference was not statistically significant. Hartone improved BP response to stress test in two patients and ejection fraction in one. Hartone was better tolerated than ISMN and showed no evidence of hepatic or renal impairment. Its effects on lipid profile was not consistent.

CONCLUSION: Hartone is a safe and effective anti-anginal agent comparable to ISMN and is better tolerated. Large scale, randomised, double blind trials are needed to prove its efficacy.

 

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